Anxiety sufferers need creative approaches.

 

Anxiety is increasing in children and teens.  There are many forms of anxiety, and often, they start in childhood.  Often people with anxiety suffer from the overwhelming symptoms it causes.

Here are some of the most common anxiety disorders:

  1. Generalized anxiety–This is the child or teen who worries about everything.  They might experience sleep or concentration problems, worries about school, peer relations and at times feel overwhelmed by most situations.
  2. Separation anxiety– This type of anxiety makes it difficult for a child to separate from its parents. It typically hits between the ages One to three but can affect older kids too.
  3. Selective mutism–These children refuse to speak in social settings, but at home can be quite talkative.  They tend to avoid social situations, eye contact and often have difficulties in relationships with peers.
  4. Specific phobia–This is the fear of certain things or situations.  A child with a phobia might be afraid of elevators, closed in spaces, or animals.  This fear goes beyond what we expect to be typical responses to new situations.
  5. Panic disorder– This is an intense anxiety response that causes physical symptoms and worrisome thoughts–rapid heartbeat, the desire to run from a situation, mind-racing, feeling that something terrible is going to happen.
  6. Social anxiety disorder–The child has an intense fear of social situations.  They feel very self-conscious and struggle in peer relationships. They also tend to socially isolate because being in the company of others feels overwhelming.

Adults aren’t immune to anxiety, and often it runs in families.  If you suffer from anxiety, it increases your child’s risk of having the disorder.

At The Center for Child Development, we’re continually working to find creative ways to help families.  Because anxiety is such a huge problem for kids and teens, we’re looking for ways to improve how we assist them in managing anxiety.   Last summer, we had groups, and they were beneficial.  As we get closer to the summer, we’re busy working on other plans.

One thought is to do a therapy program like this onehttps://www.austinanxiety.com/services/camp-courage/

While it’s not possible to host an overnight camp, we’re considering an intensive day camp for children and teens who have anxiety.   As we prepare for the summer programs, we’d love feedback from you.  Please let us know how we can help you and your child who has anxiety.  Would you be willing to have your child attend a week-long camp just for kids with anxiety?  Would you be willing to take our survey to help us plan better?

Please click this link and do this brief survey.  We would greatly appreciate it!  It will take less than three minutes.

https://www.surveymonkey.com/r/VFS5TSH

 

Even if you’re not interested in a summer camp program, we can help your child or teen.  Call our office and get connected with one of our therapists.

302-292-1334 x 101

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